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5 Simple Exercises for Bunions

A bunion (also known as hallux valgus) is a deformity of the big toe where the 1st metatarsal phalangeal joint is misaligned. With this deformity, the muscles surrounding the big toe are at an imbalance. In particular, the muscle that pulls the big toe towards the lesser toes is at a mechanical advantage, pulling the big toe closer to the one beside it. This is muscle is called the Adductor Hallucis. To counteract this muscle, we have to strengthen the opposing muscle: the Abductor Hallucis.

The following exercises and stretches focus on the smaller muscles of the foot, which is essential in managing bunions and the pain associated with them.

Toe curls and spreads

Curling toes down and spreading toes upwards

Do this exercise sitting with your foot several inches off the floor. Curl the toes down as if you want to grab something with the toes. Hold that position for 10 seconds and release. Then bring your heel to the ground, lift your foot slightly and spread your toes as far apart as possible. Hold that position for 30 seconds. Do this 5 times on each foot.

Towel grip and pull

Curled toes pulling towel towards foot

Place a towel on the ground and put your foot on top of the towel. Then use your toes to scrunch the towel towards you. Do this for 1-2 minutes on each foot.

Toe stretches

Hand gently pushing toes downward

Use your fingers to press your big toe down and hold that stretch for 30 seconds. Then position your toe in the opposite direction and use your fingers to help reach the end range of motion. Hold this stretch for 30 seconds. Do this 5 times on each foot.

Toe resistance exercises

Use your fingers or your other big toe to create resistance so that the small muscles within the foot are isolated and activated. Place your finger on top of the big toe and while applying a small amount of pressure downwards, move your toe in the opposite direction. Hold this for 10 seconds. Then bring your finger under the toe and apply a bit of pressure pushing the toe upwards. While doing this, push your toe downwards and hold for 10 seconds. Finally, bring your finger to the side of your big toe pushing it towards the second toe. While applying this pressure, move your big toe away from the lesser toes. Hold this for 10 seconds. Do this entire exercise 5 times on each foot.

Toe circles

Do this sitting on a chair. Bring your foot on the knee and use your hand to grip your big toe and run it through circular motions. This keeps the joint mobile.

At first, these exercises may seem unnatural and difficult to do, but with time and consistency, you will get the hang of it!

For more information on bunions, click here!

For more inquiries and hopes to speak to a Licensed Chiropodist, book an appointment at Feet First Clinic.

We are open six days a week!

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetic foot care and foot exams are extremely important for individuals who have just been recently diagnosed, those who have been living with diabetes for several years or at risk individuals.

Individuals living with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing infections and peripheral vascular disease.

What to expect:

For your first visit be sure to come prepared with a list of medication you are currently taking, bring a pair of your widely used footwear, and be sure to discuss any foot/knee/hip issues you may be experiencing.

The Chiropodist will do a full diabetic foot assessment and treatment which includes nail and callus care.

Diabetic Foot Assessment:

A diabetic foot assessment is a step by step approach to testing your vascular system, sensory system, motor system, skin system and footwear. It is highly recommended to have an annual assessment for most individuals living with diabetes. However, certain higher risk individuals need to be monitored more closely.

  • Vascular Assessment: an assessment to test your blood supply to your feet. Blood supply can become limited to the feet and extremities with long standing diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes and old age. The assessment includes taking pulses, measuring the blood flow back to the skin, gradual cooling of the lower limb to the feet and assessing the skin and nails for any vascular changes.
  • Sensory Assessment: an assessment to test your feeling in your feet. Often with long standing or uncontrolled diabetes, the small and large nerves in your feet can be affected and eventually stop working. The assessment includes testing different locations on your feet with your eyes closed, vibration test, light touch test, and soft pinch test.
  • Motor Assessment: an assessment to test your most important joints for walking. If your gait is impaired, pressures will not be distributed properly which may cause the build up of calluses, corns or even diabetic pressure ulcers.
  • Skin Assessment: an assessment of your skin and nails to check for corns, calluses, ingrown nails, warts, dry or cracked heels, diabetic ulcers or fungal infections to name a few. Since healing is impaired alongside diabetes, it is very important to treat any infections immediately.
  • Footwear Assessment: an assessment to make sure your shoes are being properly worn and they are not causing any calluses or sores to develop.

Diabetic Foot Treatment:

A diabetic foot treatment is a safe medical pedicure which includes nail and skin care. It is very important to avoid nail salons and spas as they do not use clean sterilized instruments nor do they have the medical knowledge necessary to provide diabetic foot treatment. Diabetic nail care includes trimming your nails safely and properly, cleaning out the corners from each nail and thinning out thick/rough nails. Skin treatment includes taking down any hard calluses or corns in a safe manner to a proper depth and even distribution. If any pressure points were noted in the footwear or skin assessment, these pressure points are addressed and often your footwear will receive a makeover to help your feet feel better.

Taking care of your feet is an important aspect of overall diabetic care and that includes having a Licensed chiropodist to be a part of your diabetic health team.

Foam Rolling 101: Why And How To Do It

Foam rolling is one of the easiest ways to keep your legs at their best.

Foam rolling is a self-therapy method used to eliminate general fascia restrictions. Think of foam rolling as your own personal massage therapist.

What is foam rolling?

Foam rolling involves using a foam roller as a method of release. By using your own body weight, the method is simple, effective and low-cost. Foam rolling is a great injury prevention method and can leave your muscles feeling refreshed afterwards.

Some people who foam roll do it as a warm-up to exercise, as it gets the muscles firing and activated. For example, some runners foam roll before activity to ensure their muscles aren’t cold when heading out the door.

Alternatively, foam rolling can be done after exercise, to break up the fascia, and knots that develop in the muscles.

What type of foam roller to buy

There are a number of different types of foam rollers on the market, from simple to premium.

Foam Rolling

Basic foam rollers can be found at most sporting goods stores for approximately $30.

Depending on your needs, a basic foam roller may do just fine. On the other end of the spectrum are more premium options, including Hyperice and Trigger point. These products are meant more for deep tissue massages and have additional features like vibration. Typically, the foundation of these rollers are made of stiff plastic with a foam outer layer, so they will last longer than a purely foam product. As their cores are also plastic, they also have a lot less ‘give.’

Foam rollers also come in various sizes. You can find travel sizes so they fit in your luggage if you’re a frequent traveller, Or, there are standard versions which cover a greater surface area of your leg and are often less painful because weight is dispersed more evenly across where you’re rolling. Fortunately, because they’re largely inexpensive, owning more than one won’t break the bank.

It should be noted that there are alternative ways to roll, including using tennis or lacrosse balls. The smaller the object, the more precise you can be with targeting trouble spots, or ‘trigger points.’

Foam Rolling

According to the American Council on Exercise, foam rolling  “focuses on reducing pain or the discomfort that comes from the myofascial tissue—the tough, but thin membranes that cover and surround your muscles.”

How to do it

Foam rolling can be tricky at first, but you can get the hang of it pretty quickly. Using your body weight, position the foam roller about two-thirds to the bottom of your body, or to wherever on your legs you want to target. Then, roll slowly and gently back and forth and pause on particularly tight spots.

You can reduce the pressure by bearing more weight on your upper body, or when you’re on your side, by having your torso on the ground. There should be some discomfort, but don’t go as far as feeling intense pain.

You’ll want to avoid bones, and focus on the muscles, specifically trigger points. These refer to specific knots that form in the muscles, that will benefit from being rolled out, which increases blood flow to the area.

Typically, anywhere from 30 seconds to two minutes is appropriate for an area before moving on. In total, spend 10-15 minutes rolling various parts of your legs, even if they’re not particularly sore. Remember, sore muscles in one spot may mean the problem is actually somewhere else, so distribute the rolling appropriately.

Foam Rolling

Foam rolling doesn’t just have to be on your legs either. You can do your back, hips, arms, shoulders, and whatever else is sore.

Benefits

There are a number of benefits to foam rolling, both as an injury treatment, as well as for injury prevention. Best of all, it’s one of the most affordable methods of self-treatment needing little more than a $30-40 product, that lasts quite a few years too.

According to the American Council on Exercise, foam rolling has been shown to help the following conditions: 

  • IT band syndrome
  • Patellofemoral pain syndrome (runner’s knee)
  • Shin splints
  • Lower-back pain
  • Infrapatellar tendinitis (jumper’s knee)
  • Blood flow, overall soreness
  • Joint range of motion

If pain continues to persist, and foam rolling doesn’t seem to be helping, your injury may be more serious.

For all of your foot treatment needs, schedule an appointment, or contact Feet First Clinic at 416-769-FEET(3338).

Why It’s Important to Keep Your Feet Covered Up

Walking around barefoot is not the wisest decision. The main reason to keep your feet covered up is that it lowers your chances of catching an embarrassing condition. When you expose your bare soles to a germ covered floor, you can accidentally pick up a virus or fungus.

Athlete’s Foot

Skipping your shoes and walking barefoot can lead to athlete’s foot — it can even happen in the comfort of your own home. The foot fungus is contagious. When a family member or roommate has an irritating infection, you are likely to contract it too. A person with this specific fungal infection will contaminate the floor whenever they walk over it barefoot.

Exposing your feet to the contaminated area raises your risk of infection. If you’ve never suffered from the foot fungus before, here are some common symptoms of athlete’s foot that you should recognize:

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Stinging
  • Dry, cracking skin
  • Rash
  • Odour

Toenail Fungus

You can catch toenail fungus from a surface that’s been contaminated by someone with the infection. You can also get an infected toe if you have athlete’s foot. The foot fungus spreads from the soles and up into your toenails, turning them thick, brittle and yellow. You can click here to find out what causes toenail fungus other than contaminated floor surfaces and wandering athlete’s foot. Knowing the risks can help you avoid an uncomfortable infection.

Plantar Warts

If you walk around barefoot, you can also contract the human papillomavirus (HPV) through your sole and develop a plantar wart. It is a small rough growth that looks like a callus or corn. Since the plantar wart is on the bottom of your foot, it can feel tender or painful when you stand, walk or put pressure on it in any other way.

What Should You Do?

Start by breaking the bad habit of walking around barefoot. You can wear waterproof shower shoes in public spaces like gym locker rooms, swimming pool decks and saunas to protect your feet. Surfaces that are warm and moist present a higher risk of contamination.

Buy some pairs of indoor slippers for the home and place them by your main entrance. This way, you can effectively cover up your bare feet and avoid tracking outside dirt on your clean floors.

Here are some other simple tips to avoid infection:

  • Wash your feet every day
  • Moisturize your feet if your skin is dry
  • Cover up cuts or wounds on your feet with bandages

If you happen to contract any of these infections, you should make an appointment with one of our licensed chiropodists. We have the best foot solutions in Toronto — we can do everything from nail fungus treatment to plantar wart excision. When over-the-counter medications and home remedies don’t do the trick, experts can give you effective treatment options.

As an additional perk, slippers and shower shoes protect your bare feet from any objects lying on the floor. You’ll appreciate the protective barrier when you step over something sharp like a shard of glass, something hard like a discarded toy piece, or something disgusting like a cat’s hairball.

 

Trick or Treat: How to Prepare for Halloween

Are you prepared for Trick or Treating this year? Halloween is fast approaching and with the unpredictable October weather you want to be ready for anything.

Footwear & Socks

You will be spending a few hours walking around outside so the most important preparation is good footwear. Ideal footwear for Trick or Treating should be waterproof or water resistant. Avoid putting your kids in mesh running shoes as they can get too wet while running through grass or leaves. Your kids should also be wearing warm socks made out of Merino wool or Bamboo for extra moisture wicking properties. While your kids are busy running from one house to the next, you will be mostly standing. To prevent tired and achy legs, consider wearing compression stockings. Sigvaris Merino Wool Compression stockings are a great outdoor compression stocking that keeps you thermoregulated.

Be seen

The most important Halloween safety rule to follow is to be properly seen. Most Halloween costumes are too dark for the night time Trick or Treating. Consider putting your kids in brightly colored or white costumes or adding a splash of colour to their costume with reflective padding/stickers. Another great idea is for kids and adults to wear glow sticks, bracelets or headbands.

Foot Spray

After a long night of walking and running around in the wet or damp weather, it is recommended to sanitize all footwear. Bacteria and fungus thrive in warm moist environments created by excessive moisture with sweaty feet in wet or damp shoes. Gehwol Foot and Shoe deodorant helps to kill odour causing bacteria and eliminate fungal spores in shoes. It is recommended to remove the insole or orthotic inside the shoe, spray the Gehwol Foot and Shoe deodorant inside and let it dry overnight.

Sore Feet? 

You have been at work all day and now you have to take your kids out Trick or Treating so get your feet ready with some extra support. If you have tired and sore feet at the end of the day, consider wearing orthotics to help align your feet in the most efficient position.

Custom foot orthotics are recommended for people who experience sore feet, heel pain, ankle pain or have too much movement/drifting in their joints (like a bunion or hammer toes) Superfeet are the best non-prescription and non-custom insole you can buy. Superfeet have a harder plastic shell which offer general arch support and are the most widely used insole for athletes.

superfeet insoles

Another great device to help your feet feel better is the Bunion Aligner.

The Bunion Aligner helps to correctly position your big toe while strengthening your muscles and ligaments around the joint.

BUNION ALIGNER POSTS
Bunion Aligner

Many individuals who wear the bunion aligner have found less pain around the bunion area, a wider gap between the first and second toe and less pain in the balls of their feet.

Call Feet First Clinic to book an appointment for a biomechanical assessment and gait analysis to find out if orthotics or bunion aligners are right for your feet.

How to Manage Foot Calluses

Calluses are thickened and hardened layers of skin that develop as a result of pressure or friction. It is the skin’s way of protecting itself from these external forces. Calluses may appear yellow, white, or grey in hue and can be accompanied by dry scaling skin and even fissures.

Because our feet take on a lot of stress (i.e. supporting our body weight and taking us wherever we need to go) calluses are commonly seen on the feet, particularly at the heels and balls of feet. Ill-fitting footwear can also cause calluses to form on the sides or the tops of toes. While calluses are generally harmless, when left untreated for a prolonged period of time, they can become very uncomfortable to walk on. Not only that, but calluses also reduce the skin’s elasticity and moisture, making it more likely to crack under shear forces.

Whats the difference between a callus and a corn?

The major difference between a callus and a corn is that a callus will cover a diffuse area on the skin and usually have a relatively equal thickness, whereas a corn occurs in a localized area and contains a deep centre of hardened tissue. This deep centre is called a nucleus and it goes so deep that it presses into the underlying layers of tissue causing pain.

Corns usually form at the site of a bony protrusion and thus are commonly seen on the tops of, at the tips of, or in between the lesser digits of the foot.

How to take care of your calluses and corns

You can help manage these thickened and hardened areas of skin by:

  • Moisturizing daily with a urea based emollient (e.g. Dermal Therapy)
  • Using a foot file or pumice stone to exfoliate the dead skin away
  • Wearing proper footwear with a wide and deep toe box is highly recommended

When to seek medical attention for calluses and corns

Book an appointment to see a Licensed Chiropodist for your calluses and/or corns if you notice any of the following:

  • Pain
  • Discomfort
  • Brown or red pigmentation within the callus
  • Leakage of fluid/pus
  • Swelling and redness in the surrounding skin

Calluses and corns can build up so much that it cuts off the blood supply to the skin underneath it, causing the skin to break down.

This may result in an ulcer or wound which can become infected.

A Licensed Chiropodist will be able to remove all calluses and corns on the foot by sharp debridement. If necessary, he or she may also offload pressures from these pressure points via means of various foot supplies such as foot pads, toe wedges, or toe props, and even custom foot orthotics.

Book an appointment with a Chiropodist at Feet First Clinic today!

When You Need to Get a New Pair of Shoes

Everything has an expiration date, including your shoes. Keeping your old and worn-down footwear in your closet can take a toll on your feet later on. It’s time to take a look at your shoes to see if they’re worthy of staying or if they should be thrown out.

Wear and Tear

You know that it’s time for a new pair of shoes when your favourite pair is looking worse for wear. Small problems like chewed-up laces and slipping insoles can be easily replaced. But, you should consider throwing out the pair when you spot one or more of these red flags:

  • The tread has been smoothed over from friction and repetitive impact.
  • There are creases in the mid-sole and heel.
  • The heel cup is fraying or completely split so that it rubs against your skin.
  • There are rips in the toe box and on the sides.

Essentially, if your shoes look and feel nothing like they did when you first bought them, you need to get some upgrades as soon as possible.

High Mileage

You need to track how much distance you’ve covered in your athletic shoes so that you can tell when they need to be put away for good. The logic behind this is simple: the further you go with your shoes, the faster they wear out. If you’re only using a pair to go on short walks around the neighbourhood every weekend, you won’t need to get an upgrade for a long time.

Ideally, you should get a new pair of running shoes after running or walking 500 kilometres in them. Avid runners and joggers can meet this goal in a matter of months, especially when they’re training for 5Ks, half-marathons, marathons and other ambitious races.

Pain and Discomfort

An old pair of athletic shoes can be the catalyst behind a long list of problems. When they aren’t offering proper arch support and shock absorption, they’re going to punish your feet, your knees, your legs and other connecting muscles and joints. For instance, if you suffer from Iliotibial band syndrome or a stubborn case of plantar fasciitis, you need to take a look at the shoes you’re exercising in.

You can visit some of the best chiropodists in Toronto to diagnose your painful condition and get treatment fast.

What Should You Do About It?

If you’ve noticed these warning signs, you need to get appropriate replacements for your bad shoes. One out of the three warning signs is too many.

You should check out our on-site shoe store for upgrades that are guaranteed to offer superior arch support and shock absorption during high-impact activities and long-distance runs. Our experts will make sure to measure your feet and recommend shoe styles so that you find the perfect match.

Book an appointment with a chiropodist to deal with problems like plantar fasciitis, runner’s knee and hammer toe. They will provide effective treatment options, including custom orthotic inserts and foot care recommendations. So, if your shoes took a toll on your body, you can find upgrades and start your physical recovery at Feet First Clinic.

You wouldn’t keep a shirt that has frayed seams and holes in the fabric. You wouldn’t keep a pair of pants that were painfully tight and left angry red marks on your skin. Don’t treat your running shoes any different. Get rid of them when they wear out.

Solve Your Ankle Pain with Supportive Shoes

The most popular shoe style used for ankle support is the high-top — this shoe style extends above the ankle. Lots of basketball players sport high-tops because they want to reduce their risk of ankle injuries from jumping, landing, falling and getting hit by other players.

Sadly, there’s no scientific proof that high-top sneakers prevent more injuries than low-top sneakers on the basketball court. The height of the heel cover might not matter when it comes to support. So, what will make a shoe better for your ankles?

A Good Fit

Shoes that don’t fit properly are more likely to lead to foot conditions and injuries. You should come to Feet First Clinic to have your feet measured and get the best fit.

A Strong Tread

Look for rubber soles with strong tread. These give your shoe grip and support on different terrain, preventing your feet from sliding or slipping when they hit the ground.

Orthotic Inserts

Orthotic inserts will keep your feet steady while you’re moving and increase shock absorption in your shoes. When you get them custom-made, orthotics can alleviate discomfort from arch problems, musculoskeletal conditions and recovering injuries.

Causes of Ankle Pain

Long-term foot conditions can cause ankle pain and discomfort just as severe as a sudden sports injury. Here is a brief list of examples:

Stress Fractures

Stress fractures are small cracks in the bone. When the muscles can’t absorb the shock from impact, the bones take the damage. Unlike a break, stress fractures deal with small shocks from repetitive activities. They’re overuse injuries found in athletes like runners and basketball players.

Chronic Ankle Instability

The medical condition called chronic ankle instability might be easier to recognize as the common term “weak ankles,” where someone frequently rolls or turns their ankles. This condition often happens to people who had a previous ankle sprain that didn’t heal properly.

Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendinitis is a condition caused by the chronic strain and inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The swelling and pain affect the heel and surrounding areas, including the ankles. People notice the symptoms of Achilles tendinitis the most when they’re exercising.

High Arches

Up to 20% of the population have feet with high arches. The problem with high arches is that they don’t distribute shock evenly throughout the foot, only letting it hit the ball and heel. The uneven distribution leads to symptoms like heel pain, ball of foot pain and ankle pain. Click here to read more about high arches and what other foot conditions they are closely connected to.

If you’re not sure what’s the cause behind your ankle troubles, you should visit a chiropodist. They will diagnose the issue and present you with effective treatment options. Book an appointment at the foot and ankle clinic right after you notice any suspicious symptoms.

Whenever you’re dealing with foot pain, you need to investigate your shoes. The wrong types of footwear could be contributing to that pain, meaning the right types of replacements can offer relief. Anyone who is living with ankle problems should get themselves a new pair of supportive shoes.

In Everything Give Thanks

Thanksgiving is just around the corner and that means spending time with family and friends. It also means spending a lot of time staying inside preparing, cooking and eating. It is important to be mindful about proper footwear at home especially during the holidays when we spend the most time walking around barefoot.

Recent studies find that it is not recommended to walk around barefoot at home when you have hardwood floors, laminate or ceramic floors. When we strike our heel, the pressures from the ground are absorbed by our heels by means of pronation. However, most people who are “heavy footed” lack proper shock absorption and with every heel strike those hard ground reactive forces are being transferred to the joints at an alarming force.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, people who walk with a “slap foot” have too much shock absorption and lack the ideal structure for proper pressure redistribution. If you are experiencing any heel pain, pain in the balls of the feet or your feet just feel tired – then you are definitely putting your feet at more risk by walking around barefoot. We often suggest wearing Birkenstocks as slippers for inside the house.

Birkenstocks have a cork footbed which is one of the best materials for shock absorption. The arch support also helps balance your foot and heel in the proper position for shock absorption. Also, straps around the ankle and the arch create a more stable platform for support. If you find Birkenstocks too hard or uncomfortable, a great alternative is Mephisto which have a softer footbed but equal support and shock absorption as Birkenstocks.

mephisto clog
Mephisto – Thea

If you find you are susceptible to corns or calluses or you have been struggling with a painful corn or callus, then it is necessary to be wearing shoes inside the house. Calluses occur due to pressures not being absorbed properly while corns occur usually within a callus due to excessive pinpoint pressure.

Excessive swelling can occur in the ankles and feet if you are standing for long hours. Along with the swelling, the veins can be overworked and eventually become twisted and bulge out as varicose veins. Compression stockings help promote circulation and prevent varicose veins and swelling.

compression stockings science

It is recommended to wear them while standing or sitting for long hours to make sure circulation is constantly flowing.

This year enjoy the Thanksgiving holidays with friends and family with pain free feet legs and feet.

The Anatomy of Toe Deformities

The lesser digits in the foot are prone to deformity when there is an imbalance to the muscles, tendons, or ligaments surrounding the toe joints. These imbalances can occur due to faulty biomechanics, having excessively long toes, neuromuscular disease, systemic conditions (such as rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes), ill-fitting footwear choices, and genetics. Depending on where the bend in the toe occurs, the descriptive name for each deformity is given. Lesser toe deformities are commonly seen in a high arched foot or a foot with bunions. Continue reading to find out more about the different types of lesser digital deformities and how they can be prevented and treated.

Types of Toe Deformities:

Illustration of mallet toe, hammer toe, claw toe, and retracted toe

Mallet toe

A mallet toe has an abnormal bend in the joint of the toe that is closest to the toenail.

Hammer toe

A hammer toe has an abnormal bend in the middle joint of the toe. This term is commonly used as a general term to describe all lesser toe deformities.

Claw toe

A claw toe has an abnormal bend in both the middle joint and the last joint closest to the toenail of a toe.

Retracted toe

A retracted toe is very similar to a claw toe. In fact, it is a claw toe that is also pulled back or retracted so that the digit abnormally bent but also lifted from the ground.

Treatment and Prevention

All lesser toe deformities can either be flexible or rigid. The aim of treatment is to keep the joints in the toe flexible and prevent progression to a rigid deformity.

The following recommendations will help to do just that:

Wear properly fitting and supportive footwear

Wearing shoes that are the correct size is the simplest thing you can do to help your feet. If you do not know your foot size, use a standard foot measuring device to measure your foot before you purchase shoes. Always trying on shoes and walking around the store in them before purchasing will also help to determine if they fit properly. As a general rule, there should be about 1 cm distance between the longest digit and the end of the shoe. If you have digital deformities, look for shoes that are wide and deep enough at the toe box. Bring your shoes to Feet First Clinic if you want them stretched to accommodate bunions and hammer toes. Finally, avoid wearing unsupported shoes such as flip flops that encourage your toes to grip the shoe as you walk. Instead, opt for shoes that have arch support in the foot bed, a cushioned sole, and a minimal to low heel.

Address biomechanical issues

Faulty foot mechanics such as overpronation, which is the movement exhibited when your foot rolls towards your arches as you walk, can be a major culprit of hammer toes. In a pronated foot, the smaller muscles in the foot lose their function and the larger muscles gain mechanical advantage causing the toes to curl. The good news is that overpronation can be corrected and managed by custom foot orthotics -functional devices that are made to support, stabilize, and align the foot in its most anatomically efficient position.

Address painful corns and calluses

Lesser toe deformities can result in areas of increased pressures on the digits and consequently painful corns and/or calluses in these places. See your local chiropodist for debridement of these painful lesions and ask him or her about any over the counter toe supplies such as, hammer toe crests and silicone toe sleeves that may help.

Strengthen the muscles in the foot with these daily foot exercises.

As mentioned previously, toes bend abnormally due to muscular imbalance. This muscular imbalance can be caused by weak muscles in the foot and lower limb. Stretching and strengthening exercises will help to maintain flexibility in the digits and prevent less toe deformities.

Book an appointment with one of our Licensed Chiropodist at Feet First Clinic for your hammer toe concerns.

We are located at 2481 Bloor Street West and are open six days a week!