pin Our Location 2481 Bloor St. W, Toronto 416.769.3338(FEET)

clock Mon 10am-6pm Tues 9am-6pm Wed-Fri 10am-6pm Sat 10am-3pm calendar Book Appointment

See A Licensed Chiropodist

416-769-FEET(3338)

Shockwave Therapy For Feet and More

Shockwave Therapy For Feet and More

You hear the term “Shockwave Therapy” every now and then around physiotherapy clinics, speciality foot clinics and by friends! But what does it mean? Why does it sound so cool? What’s being shocked?!

We’ll be covering the benefits and factors involved in the shockwave therapy process below.

Untitled-1

Is Shockwave Therapy Effective? 

Extracorporeal shockwave therapy was originally used in 1980 as a non-invasive medical procedure for the breakdown of kidney stones. However, in the last twenty years or so, it is being used as a method for treating a number of orthopaedic disorders including plantar fasciitis, Tennis elbow, calcific tendonitis of the shoulder, Achilles tendinopathy, and patellar tendinopathy. Many scientific research articles, including a review article in the Journal of orthopedic surgery and research by Ching-Jen Wang, prove positive effects (ie significant reduction of pain and improved functionality) with the use of shockwave therapy as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, making it an evidence-based therapeutic modality.

Benefits of Shockwave Therapy 

Extracorporeal shockwave therapy is a safe, effective, convenient way to treat painful tendinopathies especially when all other conservative routes have proven unsuccessful. It has the potential of replacing surgery for a number of musculoskeletal disorders and therefore, avoids the risks and post-operative care that come along with invasive procedures. Recovery and side effects of shockwave therapy are minimal and generally well tolerated.  

What Does Shockwave Therapy Do? 

The exact mechanism of action of shockwave therapy is not fully understood, but what we do know is that through the application of high-intensity sound waves concentrated to a focal area, a cascade of biological responses is propagated. This in turn enhances metabolism, circulation, revascularization, and tissue regeneration. Ultimately, an induced inflammatory response encourages natural healing and repair of the tendon.

Shockwave03

How Long Does Shockwave Therapy Take to Work?

How long it takes shockwave therapy to work will depend on the indication and tissue response. If improvements are seen, treatment will usually continue until complete resolution of symptoms. On average, shockwave therapy requires about 3-6 sessions, waiting a week between appointments. One treatment lasts 15-30 minutes.

Need a Recommendation?

If you’re in Toronto, we recommend Bloor Jane Physiotherapy as our place of choice for all your shockwave therapy and physiotherapy needs. We specialize in foot care services, conditions and treatments. Often it’s complimentary to pair any treatment to your muscles, with a follow-up shockwave therapy treatment. Unlike most other muscle relief, shockwave therapy is among the most immediate options toward relief.

Steps Towards a Solution

Call 415-766-2050 to Book An Appointment at Bloor Jane Physiotherapy and/or

Call 416-769-3338 to Book Your Foot Assessment at Feet First Clinic Today!

Should I Worry About My Kids’ Feet?

First off, do not panic. Children are developing beings. For the most part, common “foot abnormalities” in children spontaneously resolve as development progresses. At birth, a baby’s foot is made up of mostly cartilage, which hardens or ossifies to actual bones with age. Until a child’s foot develops adult bones, it will be very soft and flexible. As infants mature and learn to walk, their bodies undergo a process known as developmental unwinding where their limbs will unfold and externally rotate. In fact, the hips can unwind even up until age fourteen. 

Bare feet in a pile of shoes. Children’s foot on the background of sneakers. Foot and shoes

With that being said, it is important to be attentive to your child and what they may be trying to tell you as well as knowing when certain behaviours or tendencies do not follow the correct linear pattern of development. If your child is complaining of pain, “tired feet”, or is overly clumsy and/or frequently tripping, it is important to talk to your child’s paediatrician for further investigation. Your child’s paediatrician may then recommend a visit to a foot care specialist for proper podiatric management to prevent progression of symptoms into adulthood.

Here is a list of common foot problems seen in children.

Flat Feet

Flat feet are part of normal development in children up until the age of six. If your child has a mild and flexible flat foot and is under the age of 6, there is a good chance he or she may grow out of it. However, if your child is severely flat-footed, is developing pressure points, and is experiencing symptoms (this includes not wanting to participate in activities or sports because of foot pain or discomfort), it is a good idea to seek professional advice. Your child may be recommended custom made orthotics or over the counter arch supports. 

In-Toeing

In-toeing, commonly known as pigeon-toed is said to be the most common reason why parents seek podiatric care for their child. It is when the toes point inward toward the midline of the body rather than straight forward with walking. In-toeing is usually related to the developmental unwinding process and can be attributed to abnormalities at various levels of the lower limb such as the hip, femur, tibia, foot itself. More often than not, in-toeing spontaneously resolves without causing long term issues. However, treatment is warranted if the child is complaining of symptoms such as pain, difficulty walking, or exemplifying over-pronatory compensations that may cause future complications. Talk to your chiropodist regarding gait plates and whether your child is a good candidate for them.

Barefoot on the background of shoes. Feet in a pile of shoes. Children’s foot on the background of sneakers. Foot and shoes

Toe Walking

Toe walking is a normal occurrence in children as they learn how to walk, up until the age of three. Most children who continue to toe walk after the age of three and are otherwise developing normally, do so out of habit. Other causes include a congenital short Achille’s tendon, or other disorders such as, cerebral palsy, autism, and muscular dystrophy. In any case, talk to your child’s paediatrician regarding toe walking past the age of two. If your child is doing this habitually, it is important to establish heel to toe gait with the help of routine stretching and recommended footwear.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is an inflammation of the growth plate in the heel bone. It is the most common cause of heel pain in growing children and young athletes between the ages of seven and twelve and is associated with growth spurts and increased activity levels. Rest assured, this condition is very common and self-limiting once the growth plate ossifies. Management lies in mitigating pain via rest from strenuous activities, daily stretches, and a biomechanical assessment to determine if faulty foot mechanics may be contributing to the problem.

Need Medical Attention?

If you have been recommended by your child’s paediatrician to have your child’s feet assessed by a foot specialist, we’ve got you covered. Call us even to ask about a quick question and we’d be happy to point you in the right direction! 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

Is Compression Gear Worth It?

Long story short, the answer is, it depends. Compression stockings can be very beneficial when given to the right individual and for the right reasons. There are support stockings and medical compression garments. Support stockings are the ones you find at your local retail or drug store. They are considered over the counter stockings that provide about 15-20mmHg of compression, which essentially exerts a passive resistance to swelling. On the other hand, medical-grade compression stockings not only offer higher levels of compression, but they are made according to strict medical and technical guidelines to ensure adequate ankle pressure and graduated compression up the limb. Before you decide to get measured for and purchase compression gear, talk to your doctor about them as they are not for everybody.

Here are four conditions compression therapy is commonly recommended for:

legs runner in compression calf sleeve

1. Edema

Edema is the medical term for swelling. It occurs when the small blood vessels in your body leak fluid to the surrounding tissue. As this fluid accumulates in the tissue, the tissues begin to swell. Edema can be the result of a number of disorders and diseases, some of which will be expanded in the points below. Others include, congestive heart failure, excessive retention of sodium and water, pregnancy, constrictive pericarditis, and prolonged inactivity. In some cases, edema in the lower extremity can lead to impaired wound healing, increased risk of infection, and pressure sores. As a result, it is highly recommended to speak to your doctor if you are experiencing edema in your feet and lower legs.

2. Varicose veins

Varicose veins are veins that have become diseased and appear enlarged, swollen, and twisted. They develop due to increased pressure in the venous system, causing damage to the valves that control proper blood flow back to the heart. As backflow of blood occurs, blood pools in the veins and causes them to dilate (widen in diameter). These are the start of venous insufficiency.

3. Chronic venous insufficiency

As the venous disease progresses, chronic venous insufficiency may develop. Similar to varicose veins, chronic venous insufficiency is the result of valvular incompetence. Damaged valves compromise the flow of blood back to the heart and eventually, deep vein emptying cannot occur. Chronic venous insufficiency is also the most common cause of deep vein thrombosis. Symptoms include aching, heavy legs, lower leg and ankle edema, and moderate to severe varicosities. Chronic venous insufficiency can also lead to skin diseases such as stasis dermatitis (red, dry, itchy skin), hemosiderin deposits (brown pigmentation due to iron deposits in the skin), and ulcerations.

man runner in compression socks

 4. Venous thrombosis

Venous thrombosis describes a blood clot in a vein with accompanying inflammation of the vessel wall. Signs and symptoms of venous thrombosis in the lower leg include pain in the calf, edema, redness and increased warmth of the affected leg, fever, and generally feeling unwell. 

5. Lymphedema

The lymphatic system is made of channels and nodes that work to collect and filter fluids before returning it to the bloodstream. Lymphedema presents as swelling in either one or both limbs, the swelling worsening with progression of the disease. It is caused by extra fluid build-up in tissues due to a defective lymphatic system.

Question or Concerns?

If you have been diagnosed with any of the above conditions or your doctor has recommended compression therapy as part of your treatment plan, book an appointment with one of our licensed chiropodists to be properly measured. 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

Benefits of Stretching vs Not Stretching Your Feet 

Benefits of Stretching vs not Stretching your feet  

Incorporating stretching in your daily routine has many benefits to your overall health. And your feet are no exception. As long as you are mobile, your feet, ankles, and legs are constantly working to get you from one place to another all while supporting your body weight. If you’re an athlete or your job requires you to be on your feet for most of the day, the stresses acting on them can increase significant amounts, sometimes even up to ten-fold. 

Here are 5 reasons why you should stretch your feet daily.

02

Improves Range of Motion

With age, the joints in our feet and ankles tend to become stiffer. Whether this is exacerbated by poor foot mechanics or tights muscles, stretching is a great way to keep the joints mobile. Joints that can move along its full range of motion rather than become limited allow for proper heel to toe gait.

Improves Flexibility

Stretching allows the muscle to lengthen and becomes more flexible. This keeps your joints mobile and allows for ease with dynamic movements. It also allows your foot to properly adapt to the ground and absorb shock.

Helps to Keep Feet and Ankles Strong

Stretches such as toe curls, toe splays, toe extensions, and toe points are great ways to activate and strengthen the small muscles in the foot that don’t otherwise get too much attention. Keeping the muscles strong will also reduce the stress placed on joints, which is especially important for those who suffer from arthritic conditions.

03

Helps to Prevent Injury

Injuries to the foot and ankle often occur when the muscles, tendons, and ligaments are too tight. For instance, having tight calf muscles or tight plantar fascia can increase your risk of developing conditions such as Achilles tendonitis and plantar fasciitis. Stretching these structures will help to reduce strain and tension when they are overworked or overused.

Encourages Blood Flow

Lastly, stretching your feet and ankles helps the blood to circulate to those areas, delivering oxygen and nutrients the muscles need. Stretches should be steady and held for around 30 seconds. If stretching a muscle causes pain, stop the stretch and rest. You don’t want to overwork your muscles and cause further damage.

Seeking a Medical Professional’s Opinion?

If you have ongoing foot or ankle pain that doesn’t improve, seek medical attention from a foot care specialist. Chiropodists are licensed professionals who are trained to assess and manage the diseases and disorders of the lower limb and foot.

Call 416-796-3338 or Click to Book an Appointment Today!

How To Cut Your Toenails Like a Professional

How To Cut Your Toenails Like a Professional

As simple as it may seem, trimming and filing your toenails correctly is an important part of maintaining proper foot health. It can save you from pesky and rather painful nail problems, such as ingrown toenails, broken toenails, and toenail related infections.

Here are the Dos and Don’ts of toenail cutting.

toenailcut

DOs

 

Wash and Dry Your Feet First

Clean your feet at least once a day to maintain proper hygiene. Your feet are either in contact with the ground or very close to it couped up in a pair of shoes. These circumstances make them highly susceptible to come in contact with harmful microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi. Thoroughly drying your feet will also ensure your tools do not slip and you are able to see the nail edge clearly.

Have the Right Tool(s) Available

To trim your toenails, you will need a pair of sharp nail clippers or professional nail nippers if you have very thick nails. You will also need a nail file.

Clip Nails Straight Across

When cutting the toenail, the safest way to do it is to cut the nail straight across. This will ensure the toenail continues to grow forward.

File Sharp or Jagged Edges

This is an important step. Always file any sharp corners or jagged edges to ensure the nail edge is smooth. Sharp corners can catch on socks or even poke the surrounding skin. This also ensures you do not leave a nail spike behind to grow into the skin and cause a very painful ingrown toenail.

 

DON’Ts

Ingrown Toenail 3

Wait Too Long Between Trimming Toenails

Although toenails do not grow as quickly as fingernails, they still need to be trimmed routinely. You should cut your toenails at least once every eight weeks. Keeping them long is not only uncomfortable in socks and closed-toe shoes, but it also increases the risk of the toenail breaking or cracking, and thus increases the risk of infection.

Rip, Peel, or Bite Your Toenails

Using your fingers or any other body part to “trim” your toenails is very unsafe (and unhygienic!). You have very little control when doing this and more often than not, the nail is left too short, jagged, and removed too deep.

Trim The Nails Too Short or Too Deep

The skin surrounding the nail should not be higher than the toenail as this may cause the nail to grow into the skin instead of on top of it. Rather, the nail should be cut to the edge of the skin and should not be cut deeper than that. Cutting the nails too short can also expose the nail bed underneath, making the area very tender.

Use Dirty Tools

Clean your tools regularly with rubbing alcohol or regularly replace them if they are disposable. Using tools that harbor germs and bacteria can be dangerous, especially if you accidentally nick your skin or have an ingrown toenail.

If you suspect you have a toenail issue, do not wait to seek attention from a licensed chiropodist, especially if you have other medical conditions such as diabetes. A chiropodist will be able to assess the problem and explore the appropriate treatment options.

Have Your Toenails Examined by a Professional Today!

We are confident in our ability to help inform you and solve your concern with the least amount of discomfort possible.

Call us at (416) 769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

Top 5 Foot Conditions to Self Assess At Home

For most people, feet are unknown territory. Being that they are the farthest body part from our eyes, they don’t get as much attention as they should. Feet should be cleaned thoroughly once a day and assessed for changes to the skin and or structure. Pain is another sign that you should not ignore. If you happen to notice changes to your feet, to help you decipher what it may be, we have come up with the following list. Continue reading to discover common foot problems and the signs to look out for if you have them.

Plantar Warts

Plantar-Wart-4-1800×1200

A plantar wart is a small growth that appears in weight-bearing areas of the foot. They are caused by the Human Papilloma Virus and are relatively harmless. At times, warts do resolve spontaneously on their own; however, some do require treatment from a medical professional.

What to look for:

  • Small, fleshy, round, rough growth usually with overlying callus
  • Tiny black dots in the lesion
  • A lesion that disturbs the normal skin lines
  • Pain with standing or pinching of the lesion 

Athlete’s Foot 

 

Athletes-Foot2-1800×1013

Athlete’s Foot is known as tinea pedis in the medical world. It an infection of the skin, the culprit being a fungus. As the name suggests, Athlete’s Foot is common in athletes or people who have sweaty feet.

What to look for:

  • Peeling, scaly skin in between the toes or bottoms of feet
  • Red rash
  • If chronic, can present as very dry, flaky skin
  • Associated itch/burn/sting 

Bunions

Hallux valgus, bunion in woman foot on white background

 What to look for:

  • A bony bump at the side of the base of the big toe
  • Redness, swelling, pain at the 1st MTP joint
  • Big toe may start to turn towards the smaller toes beside it

Plantar Fasciitis

iStock-902595216-1800×1200

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a fibrous band that runs from the heel bone to the ball of the foot. It works to support the arch of your foot and absorb the shock when you walk. When it becomes strained, it can develop small tears, usually near the heel, which cause inflammation and pain.

What to look for:

  • Sharp heel pain, usually at the inner heel
  • Pain is worse with your first steps in the morning out of bed  
  • Pain tends to subside as you go about your day
  • Pain may return with initial steps after sitting or resting

Flat Feet

flatfeet

Flat feet can only be diagnosed with you standing in a weight-bearing position. It is described as a low or nonexistent arch profile. You can check your arch by wetting your feet and standing on a piece of paper or concrete ground. If the imprint of your foot is relatively the same width along the length of your foot, you likely have a flat foot. If you have flat feet, you are also likely to roll your feet towards your arches when you walk (ie you overpronate).

What to look for:

  • Low or nonexistent arch in the foot
  • Widening of the foot when you stand
  • Possible pain at the arch of the foot, ankle, knee, or low back

If you think you have any of the above foot problems, it is of your best interest to see a Licensed Chiropodist for further assessment. A chiropodist is a foot specialist who is trained to assess and treat various diseases and conditions of the foot.

Have No Fear!

We have all your solution under one roof. Call or Book Today and we’ll have you in asap! Open 6 days a week, we’ll be happy to help inform you and solve all your concerns any day at your convenience! 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

8 Common Running Injuries

8 Common Running Injuries

Running is a great form of exercise that helps burn calories, strengthen muscles and bones, and improve cardiovascular fitness. Being that you only need a pair of running shoes and an open path, makes it very accessible, which is an added bonus. On the other hand, running also generates a lot of biomechanical stresses on the lower limb and that can potentially combine to result in injuries. Here are 8 common injuries that may occur with running. 

IT Band Syndrome

Also known as Runner’s Knee or Cyclist’s Knee, IT Band Syndrome is the most common cause of lateral (outer) knee pain in runners. It is caused by excessive friction between the iliotibial band and the end of the femoral bone where the knee is located, resulting in tightness, irritation, and inflammation when the knee is bent. Pain usually occurs a few kilometers into the run and is typically worse with downhill running. 

You are more likely to develop IT band syndrome if you have bowed legs, your foot overpronates, you have a tight IT band, or you have changed the intensity or frequency of your training.

Shin Splints

Shin splints, medically known as medial tibial stress syndrome, is described as pain at the inner portion of the shin bone. It is caused by repetitive microtrauma to the bone and/or surrounding soft tissues.

Athletes who do not build up their mileage gradually or abruptly change their workout regime by increasing intensity or changing from a flat road to hills are more likely to experience shin splints. It is also associated with weak muscles, improper footwear, and a hypermobile, pronated foot type.

shin splintsPlantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain and it is caused by inflammation of the fibrous band that runs from the heel bone to the ball of the foot. The tell-tale sign of plantar fasciitis is heel pain that is worst with the first steps in the morning out of bed. Pain also occurs with initial steps after sitting or rest.

Running puts a great deal of stress on the heel bone and strain on the plantar fascia as the arch of the foot depresses 50% more relative to walking. Overpronators, as well as increased body weight, puts you at higher risk of developing plantar fasciitis.

 Achilles Tendinopathies

Achilles tendonitis is an overuse injury of the Achilles tendon, which is a tendon that connects the calf muscle to the back of the heel bone. Repetitive strain and stress to the tendon or tissue encapsulating the tendon can result in irritation and therefore, inflammation. Pain may be along the tendon or closer to the heel bone and worsens with increased activity (ie after a run). Pain or stiffness may also be experienced in the mornings. Chronic inflammation may lead to thickening of the tendon and decreased flexibility of the ankle. Tight calf muscles, a sudden increase in running mileage, overpronation, and having bone spurs can all cause Achilles tendonitis.    

Ankle Sprains

The most common ankle sprain is an inversion ankle sprain, specifically at the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). It occurs when you “roll” your ankle inwards and the ligament is stretched or torn causing pain and swelling. The more severe the sprain, the longer the recovery.

Ankle sprain treatment requires PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation) for the first three days. Minor ankle sprains will then move onto range of motion exercises and then strengthening exercises. For more severe injuries, splints or immobilization is necessary before rehabilitation commences. You may be more likely to sprain your ankle if you have a varus deformity of the lower limb and foot, you have a hypermobile foot, you train on uneven terrain, or you have a history of ankle sprains. Improper footwear, as well as participation in sports that require dynamic foot movements, can also predispose you to ankle sprains.

sprainankleee

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

Patellofemoral pain syndrome, also known as Runner’s knee results from overuse and overload of the patellofemoral joint resulting in an “achy” pain at the front of the knee and around the knee cap. Pain is worse with activity and worsens with downhill running, running on an uneven surface, or prolonged sitting. 

Having a high arched foot, knock-knees, muscular imbalance such as weak quads and tight hamstrings, or an overpronated foot, all predisposes you to developing patellofemoral pain syndrome.

Anterior Compartment Syndrome

Compartment syndrome, specifically chronic or exertional compartment syndrome occurs when pressure builds up at the front of the lower leg as the muscle expands in volume during exercise but the tissue encasing the muscle does not. This results in a deep aching pain, tightness, and swelling. It can also lead to reduced circulation and sensation resulting in numbness, tingling, muscle weakness, and in severe cases, foot drop. Exertional compartment syndrome is caused by regular vigorous exercise and overtraining. It is initiated by activity and ceases with rest.

Csyndrome (1)Subungual Hematoma

A subungual hematoma is the medical term for bruising and bleeding under the toenail caused by trauma. With running, bruising usually occurs from the toe repetitively hitting the end of the shoe. Wearing properly fitted footwear will decrease your chances of developing a subungual hematoma. Silicone toe caps may also help.

 

If you are experiencing one or all of the injuries discussed above, incorporating a chiropodist in your circle of care may be of great benefit. Have your feet assessed today to determine if they may be a contributing factor to your pain.

 

For All Your Foot Concerns, We Can Help!

We have all your solution under one roof. Call or Book Today and we’ll have you in asap! Open 6 days a week, we’ll be happy to help inform you and solve all your concerns any day at your convenience! 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

Are Sports Shoes Worth It?

We all know regular exercise is good for our health. It has many benefits such as helping with weight loss, reducing risk of chronic diseases, and improving overall mental health.

Exercise or sport activity also builds your bones and muscles and makes them strong. On the other hand, it also puts a tremendous amount of stress and pressure on them. The feet, ankle, and legs in particular, undergo high levels of biomechanical stress during various kinds of rigorous weight-bearing activity. On top of this, each sport activity requires specific movements and are played on different surfaces. Fortunately, we live in a time when shoes are designed with all these factors in mind. Wearing activity-specific shoes will not only help to improve performance and comfort but prevent commonly associated lower extremity injuries.  

Types of Activity Specific Footwear

 

runners

Running  

Running generates a large impact on the lower limb. Forces acting on the body can reach up to ten times a person’s body weight. In addition, the arch of the foot tends to depress 50% more than in walking and the rate of pronation is generally increased. As such, running shoes are built with increased support, cushioning, and shock absorption properties. This is done in varying degrees to accommodate different foot types. The more pronation your foot exhibits, the greater amount of control and stability you should look for in a running shoe.

bballBasketball/Tennis

Basketball and tennis are sports that require a bit more dynamic movement across the court relative to running. Basketball in general, involves a lot of jumping, landing, starting, and stopping motions. As such, basketball shoes tend to have a higher upper to increase support around the ankle to increase stability and prevent ankle sprains. Court shoes tend to also have a thicker and wider outer sole that features a herringbone pattern for better grip, balance, and stability in all directions.

Baseball/Soccer

Baseball and soccer are both sports that require cleat shoes. Cleats are protrusions on the sole of the shoe that provide adequate traction on soft or slippery surfaces, such as a grass or dirt field. The shorter cleats found on soccer shoes as well as their low-cut uppers and lightweight design provide ankle manoeuvrability and better agility. A baseball cleat has an additional toe cleat in front to dig into the dirt to increase stability during sudden moments of acceleration such as running from base to base.

running

Hiking

Hiking is a long vigorous walk on trails and paths of uneven, rough terrain. You may walk through a forest, cross a river, pass a waterfall, and even climb a cliff. Wearing the proper shoes will ensure your feet are protected and able to withstand various impacts. Good hiking shoes have a wide and thick rubber lug sole to provide stability and good traction. They also have sufficient cushion and shock absorption properties as well as a waterproof membrane to keep the feet dry. 

All in all, are sports shoes worth it? Absolutely! 

Sports Foot Injury? We’re Here To Help!

If you have acquired a sport-related injury, book an appointment with one of our Licensed Chiropodists for a thorough assessment to determine an appropriate treatment plan.

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

Is Work Causing Your Foot Pain?

Is Work Causing Your Foot Pain? Do My Feet Hurt Because of My Job? 

Have you ever thought about how your job or lifestyle choices may affect your feet? Whether you are an athlete, engineer, labour worker, teacher, or health care professional, your feet are very important in your day to day life. And although anyone can develop foot problems, there are certain issues that are more commonly seen in specific professions. 

In today’s blog post, we will discuss profession and/or lifestyle specific foot concerns as well as easy tips on how to avoid them. Keeping your feet pain free and in good health will ensure you are less focussed on them and more focussed on doing your job to the best of your ability.

 

Athlete

Toenail Trauma

The purpose of a toenail is to protect the skin and bone underneath it, which means it takes on quite a bit of distress especially during rigorous activity if not properly protected itself. Due to the enormous amount of strain your feet endure during a game/work out session/training, the fast-paced stop and go motions, and the occasional collision with a member from the opposing team, your toenails are very vulnerable to trauma. Toenails can crack, become bruised, and even fall off. If damaged critically enough or repeatedly, the toenail may exhibit permanent changes such as thickening, discolouration, and stunted growth. Trauma can also encourage fungus to invade and colonize the exposed nail bed leading to stubborn toenail fungus. 

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot, which is a fungal skin infection of your foot that causes skin peeling or a red scaly rash, is another common foot problem seen in athletes. During physical activity, feet can become very sweaty while confined within socks and shoes. This provides a perfect environment for fungi to thrive; dark and moist. Athlete’s foot is also contagious and can be spread from person to person by sharing towels and walking barefoot in gyms and locker rooms.

Solution:

  • Wear proper shoes that are activity specific and the correct size and fit to avoid injury
  • Wear toe caps to protect the toenails
  • Wear moisture-wicking socks
  • Disinfect the interiors of the shoe
  • Do not share towels and do not walk barefoot in public spaces

 

Untitled-1 (1)

Working With Safety Shoes

Hyperhidrosis

Safety shoes are shoes made to protect an individual who is or may be exposed to hazards in the workplace. They are usually made with a protective material (ie steel, aluminium alloy, carbon fiber) at the toes as well as other sturdy materials at the soles and upper of the shoe. They may be puncture-resistant, slip-resistant, heat resistant, acid-resistant etc. When bought incorrectly, safety shoes can be occlusive and results in excessive sweating also known as hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis and inadequate air circulation in footwear can lead to skin infections, foul odour, and heat rashes.

Solution:

  • Buy a safety shoe that is protective and breathable
  • Wear moisture-wicking socks
  • Change your socks throughout the day when they get too damp
  • Use foot powders to soak up the excess moisture

 

Desk Jobs

Swollen legs and feet

If you are sitting for extended periods of time, you may start to notice swelling at your legs and feet by the end of the day. This is because when you are inactive, the muscles in your legs do not help to pump the blood back up to the heart. With age, this can worsen, and swelling can lead to heavy and tired legs, maybe even varicose veins. These are all signs of venous insufficiency, which suggests your veins are not efficiently pushing the blood from your lower extremities back to the heart.          

Shortened calf muscle

Some jobs have a dress code, we get it. But, believe it or not, your footwear choices can really affect the anatomy of your feet. For instance, wearing high heels on a regular basis can effectively shorten the calf muscle. Tight calves can produce symptoms such as sudden pain at the back of your calf or heel, especially when the foot is flat on the ground. Sitting with your heels lifted from the ground (tip-toed position) can also lead to this.

Ingrown toenails

Wearing improper footwear can also cause nail issues. Tight-fitting and narrow shoes apply pressure to the toes, pushing them together in a small space, which may encourage toenails to curve and become ingrown over time.

Solution:

  • Walk around every couple of hours to get the muscles in your calf working
  • Wear compression stockings
  • Do not sit with your heels lifted off the ground
  • Do not wear shoes with a heel higher than 2 inches
  • Do not wear narrow shoes

picc

Hospital Staff / Health Care Workers / Restaurant / Food Industry

Heel pain/ball of foot pain/arch pain  

Working as a healthcare professional, a waiter/waitress, chef, or even a teacher, you are on your feet for most of the day. Unless you have a perfect foot, the sheer time spent on your feet can lead to overuse injuries and soft tissue strains resulting in inflammation and overall foot pain. More often than not, these conditions are caused by faulty foot mechanics.

Solution:

  • Wear shoes with arch support, good torsional stability, and adequate cushioning
  • Wear orthotic inserts
  • If pain is worsening or consistent, have your feet assessed by a foot care professional

As always, if you have serious concerns with your feet, do not wait to seek attention from a Licensed Chiropodist.

 

Your Solutions Live Here!

All under one roof! Our team is trained to handle any and all your foot health concerns. From mild, to critical, we cover all sides of the foot needs spectrum. Call us to ask about actionable steps towards your solution today! 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Book Your Assessment Today!

5 Foot Care Tips Everyone Needs to Know About

Let’s face it, feet are probably the most neglected part of the human body. Think about it. When is the last time you checked the bottoms of your feet or in between the toes? Do you pay attention and tend to the aches and pains in your feet? Feet work hard every day to support your body and take you wherever you need to go, all while being cooped up in socks and shoes (hopefully comfortable ones at the least) for most the day. Stresses on your feet are more so if your job requires you to be on your feet, you’re a busy parent looking after an active child, you’re an athlete, or exercise is part of your daily regime. Making sure your feet get the care and love they deserve will not only leave your feet feeling better, but it will keep them healthy, keep you mobile and pain-free, and ultimately improve the overall quality of your life. Keep reading to educate yourself on five very simple foot care tips and why each is important to healthy and happy feet. 

 

_01

 

Proper Toenail Cutting/Toenail Care 

We need toenails to help protect our toes, in particular the skin and bones underneath them. Toenails are made of a protein known as keratin, which makes them less vulnerable to daily wear and tear. It is important to maintain the health of our toenails so that they can fulfil their purpose. 

Proper toenail cutting is a simple way to reduce the risk of nail complications such as ingrown toenails and toenail fungus. The safest way to cut your toenails is to cut them straight across using a clean, disinfected nail clipper. Avoid cutting the nail too short and do not cut the nail at an angle down the sides. Finish off by filing the edge of the nail smooth, getting rid of any sharp corners or jagged edges that may get caught in clothes or bed sheets and tear the nail. Toenails should be cut every six to eight weeks.

 

Moisturize 

Your skin is your body’s largest organ and it plays a vital role in creating a barrier against harmful microbes. If the skin is dry, it can become irritated, itchy, and crack. Breaks in the skin will allow bacteria to enter and may lead to inflammation and infection. 

Moisturizing your skin daily with a good moisturizer will help to hydrate the skin and keep it soft and smooth. Look for creams that contain effective ingredients such as urea and/or alpha hydroxy acid (AHA). Urea causes skin cells deep below the surface to attract, absorb and hold moisture better while AHA speeds up cell turnover and stimulates cell renewal by dissolving the bonds that hold them together. In the end, you’re left with younger-looking, smoother, and softer skin. It is best to apply moisturizer right after a shower and reapply a couple times a day.

If you have calluses, in addition to moisturizing, using a foot file or a pumice stone can help to exfoliate the skin and remove dead skin cells. Thick calluses and painful corns will need to be removed by a health care professional. Regular application of vitamin E oil on the nails can also help to keep them strong and moisturized. 

 

Wash Your Feet 

Washing your feet thoroughly (don’t forget in between the toes) and drying them well afterwards is a very simple way to keep the feet clean and healthy. And no, it is not enough to think they get cleaned in the shower from simply standing in soapy water. Wash your feet somewhat vigorously and daily with soap and water to help physically remove dirt and dead skin cells as well as prevent the build up of bacteria that can cause foul foot odours. You can also reduce the risk of infections such as Athlete’s foot and plantar warts.

 

Effective Shoes 

A proper shoe has many benefits including comfort, protection, and support. Wearing the right shoe for you will make all the difference, especially on days when your feet take on extra stress. Here are some tips to keep in mind when looking for shoes: 

  • Always try shoes on before purchasing. No two feet are the same, therefore, what may be comfortable for someone may not be comfortable for you. 
  • If you are unsure of your size, have your feet measured. Keep in mind, the right fitted shoe will have about a finger’s width between your longest toe and the end of the shoe. If you can feel the end of the shoe with your toe, it’s too small! 
  • Bring your orthotics. If you wear orthotic insoles, bring them with you and try them on with the shoes. A shoe that has a removable insole are more likely to comfortably accommodate an orthotic device. 

 

A good shoe will have the following features: 

  • The shape of the shoe matches the shape of the foot. Avoid wearing narrow or pointed shoes that force your toes to squeeze in small spaces.
  • Functional fastenings such as laces, velco, buckles. The foot should make no effort to keep the shoe on.
  • The shoe should only bend where the foot naturally bends which is at the joints that connect the toes to the rest of the foot. You should also be able to twist it slightly.
  • A firm and snug heel counter. The heel should feel gripped into the shoe.
  • The outer sole should provide enough grip and traction to prevent slippage.
  • A midsole that provides adequate cushioning and shock absorption.
  • An innersole that provides arch support.

 

Don’t Wait to See Attention

Above all, if you have ongoing foot pain or discomfort, or you’ve noticed changes to the skin or nails of your feet, don’t wait to seek attention from a licensed chiropodist. Chiropodists are primary health care professionals who specialize in the assessment, management, and prevention of dysfunctions, disorders, and diseases of the foot. More often than not, the earlier you treat your foot problems, the better the results. In particular, if you have health conditions that put you at risk such as diabetes, it is recommended to seek care right away. 

 

Have No Fear!

We have all your solution under one roof. Call or Book Today and we’ll have you in asap! Open 6 days a week, we’ll be happy to help inform you and solve all your concerns any day at your convenience! 

Call us at 416-769-3338 or Click Above to Book Your Assessment Today!