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How Your Feet Affect Your Posture

Whether you sit, stand, or are constantly on the go, your posture can have a great impact on the efficiency of your day and in the long run, your quality of life. If we get technical, correct posture is determined by optimal alignments of joints to minimize stress on them and the surrounding soft tissue structures, such as ligaments, muscles, and tendons. Basically, with correct posture, your body uses less energy when using its muscles and your body weight is distributed evenly to allow for joint stability and balance. Consequently, correct posture can reduce the risk of muscle strain, joint pain (including knee, hip, and back pain) and other complications as a result of compensation for any imbalances.

ankle lifestyle orthosleeve

Now, did you know that your feet affect your posture?

Bad or faulty posture can be the result of spinal deformities or lower limb deformities -including issues with your feet! If your feet are not doing their job in supporting your pelvis and upper body, it can cause a chain reaction up the body of poor mechanical efficiency. For instance, overpronation which is characterized by excessive inward rolling of your foot towards its arches when walking, causes internal rotation of the entire lower limb and tilt of the pelvis. This in turn will distort the alignment of the spine and thus balance is compromised, and stress increases on all the soft tissue structures attached to their bony attachments. Not sure if you overpronate? In general, people who overpronate tend to have flatter feet or lower arches.

There are even cases when only one of your feet may be overpronating, possibly due to a functional or structural difference in leg length. This leads to asymmetry of the pelvis and changes in the structures above it to compensate for this imbalance.

In any case, if you find you are experiencing continuous back pain, hip pain or knee pain you may find it worth your while to get your feet checked and include a Registered Chiropodist in your circle of care. Chiropodists examine the alignment in your feet as well as how it functions in your gait to determine if it may be contributing to the symptoms you are experiencing. Most likely, a treatment plan which includes custom foot orthotics and regular stretching exercises will be discussed. Custom foot orthotics work to correct poor foot mechanics, alter the alignment in your lower limb, limit compensations, and ultimately, get you on the road to better posture and better health outcomes.

Exploring New Cities with Healthy Feet

You have your next trip all set and ready to go- flight and hotel booked, tourist attractions noted. Maybe it’s to explore the beautiful romantic floating city of Venice, or experience the unique street food markets of Seoul, or capture the breathtaking scenic views of Banff’s glacial lakes. Wherever it is, you wouldn’t want your feet to stop you from enjoying your much-anticipated vacation. Continue reading to find 3 ways to help ensure your feet are in the best shape when exploring new cities.

  1. Compression Socks

Do your legs and feet swell when you stand or sit for a prolonged period? Do you experience painful, aching, tired, or heavy legs? If you are familiar with any of these symptoms and/or have varicose veins on your legs, it may be your body’s way of telling you your circulation is compromised, specifically your veins. Your veins work to bring the blood back to your heart; however, when their valves become ineffective, blood starts to pool wherever gravity pulls and lead to the symptoms noted above.

To counteract this, compression socks work to compress the limbs and effectively reduce the diameter of the distended veins. To put it simply, they help to push the blood back to the heart and therefore, improve circulation. Improving blood flow will in turn, control and reduce symptoms so you can focus on enjoying your vacation and not on your feet.

Compression stockings
Microfiber Shades

If you don’t have any issues with your circulation but plan on taking a  particularly long flight to your destination, consider getting compression stockings as a preventative measure. Talk to a chiropodist today about the different compression hosiery available.

  1. Proper Footwear

If you’re going to be on your feet walking around a new city, it is in your best interest to make sure you are doing it in the right pair of shoes. Your footwear is an essential part of good foot health and can be the causative or exacerbating factor of foot pain and foot injuries.

Running shoes that provide good support, shock absorption, and stability are always the best choice when walking for prolonged periods of time. One way to check for this is to take the shoes in your hands and try to twist and turn the shoe or bend it in half. A good pair of runners should not be too flimsy in structure and be the correct size.

aetrex orthopaedic shoes

Click here to read up on the best footwear for your foot type.

Whenever possible, try to limit the use of shoes such as flip flops, heels, and ballet flats. Always consider the activity when picking out your shoes for the day.

  1. Custom Foot Orthotics

Custom Orthotics

Custom orthotics are a medical device prescribed by a licensed chiropodist following a biomechanical assessment and gait analysis. If you’re experiencing foot pain, see a chiropodist to find out the root cause of your pain before you go on your vacation. There is a good chance it may be due to faulty biomechanics that need to be addressed and corrected. Increasing walking time and therefore the stresses applied to your feet while on vacation may only make the problem worse.

 

How to Keep Your Feet Safe from Infection This Summer

Nothing will dampen your spirits during a beautiful summer like a foot infection. You won’t feel like taking a long stroll by the beach when you have a painful plantar wart on your sole. You won’t want to head to a pool party when you have a bad toenail fungus. And you won’t want to go for a hike through a national park when the itch of your athlete’s foot is driving you up the wall.

If you don’t want to deal with a foot infection for the entire season, you should follow these simple rules:

1.    Don’t Go Barefoot at the Pool

The best method of prevention of foot problems in the summer is to cover up your feet with high-quality shoes because the ground is covered with bacteria, fungi and viruses that can infect your feet. Areas that are warm, wet and have lots of visitors will be especially risky. So, you should sport protective footwear when you’re walking across the deck of the community swimming pool or using the locker room showers at the gym.

Get a pair of waterproof shoes that you can wear to the swimming pool deck, public showers and locker room. After every use, you should rinse your shoes with warm water and dry them. You should also start washing your feet and drying them with a towel after going to these locations in case any contaminants got onto your feet. Then, put on a clean pair of socks and outdoor shoes.

2.    Don’t Go Barefoot at Home

You should break the habit of walking around barefoot, even at home. Other residents in your home could unknowingly transfer a contagious infection like athlete’s foot to the floor that you’re walking on every day. Wearing a pair of comfortable slippers or socks will protect your feet and prevent a frustrating cycle of infection.

If you’re worried about slippers or socks being too warm to endure in the summer heat, you can look at Feet First shoes and sandals from companies like Birkenstock, FitFlop and NAOT.

3.    Change Your Shoes and Socks Often

You should change your shoes and socks often if you want to avoid problems like toenail fungus and athlete’s foot. As previously stated, bacteria and fungus thrive in warm, moist conditions — this includes inside of your sweaty shoes and socks.

Whenever your socks get sweaty, change them and put on a cleaner pair. Don’t wear one pair of shoes every single day, especially if you’re exercising in them. Give them a chance to air out.

If your shoes are starting to smell like foot odour, let them dry in the sunshine to kill off the bacteria. You can also put your shoes in the freezer to destroy any leftover bacteria clinging to the material, as long as you remember to put the shoes in a plastic bag first.

4.    Don’t Share Your Shoes

Do you remember being told never to share hats in school because one of the other children could have lice and give it to you? You should give your shoes a similar treatment because sharing shoes with other people puts you at risks of contracting a toenail fungal infection or a bad case of athlete’s foot. Keep your shoes, boots, inserts, socks and everything else you put on your feet to yourself.

When you follow these essential rules, your feet will stay healthy and infection-free all summer long. You can go back to enjoying your favorite activities, whether it’s going for a walk through the neighbourhood park or taking a quick dip in the community swimming pool.

Do Your Feet Hurt All of the Time? Check out Your Shoes

Your feet hurt, and they hurt all of the time. Before you think about booking a foot massage or taking an Epsom salt bath, you need to take a look at your shoes to see if they’re the reasons behind your aches and pains.

Check to see if they’re worn down

If you’re experiencing foot pain, the first thing you need to do is check your shoes to see if they need to be thrown out and replaced. Over time, the support and structure that you need in a shoe will break down and your feet will suffer the consequences.

Shoes don’t have an expiration date printed on the heel, so you have to look for proof that your shoes are breaking down:

  • The tread on the sole is worn down and smooth
  • The heel on one shoe has gotten lower than the other’s heel
  • There are holes in the mesh
  • The lining is splitting open
  • They look like they’re falling apart

You should also ask yourself when you first bought the shoes. Any pair that has been in your closet for over a year could be replaced, depending on their quality and how often you wear them. The more often you wear a pair of shoes, the sooner you will need to find replacements. For instance, a pair of running shoes will degrade faster than other styles because they’re used often, and they pound more pavement than the average sandal or slipper.

Check to see if they’re the right size

Another reason why you may be experiencing foot pain is that your shoes aren’t the right fit for your feet. Try to look for signs that they’re too big or too small.

If they’re too big, your heel will slip out and the shoe will slide around while you’re walking. The friction from the material moving up and down your foot can give you blisters and bruised toenails.

If they’re too small, you won’t be able to take them off without undoing all of the laces. They shouldn’t take too much effort to pull off. You may notice numbness or strain on the top of the foot, or a burning sensation when you’re running.

Don’t assume that discomfort is normal for brand-new shoes. A pair of dress shoes should be comfortably snug but not tight or painful when you first try them on. “Breaking them in” will only stretch the leather so much. If they’re too snug, come to Feet First Clinic to get them stretched out so that you don’t have to suffer pinching or blisters. Other shoe styles can’t be “broken in” in the same way.

When you buy new shoes, have your feet measured and make sure that they fit properly right off the bat.

Check to see if they’re the right shoes

Certain types of shoes won’t offer you good support or structure. If you depend on these styles too much, you’re going to deal with painful foot conditions. For example, high-heeled shoes can cause hammertoe and mallet-toe because the toes get crowded into the toe box and instinctively curl.

The first step in choosing proper footcare is taking the shoes that are causing you discomfort out of your closet and tossing them away for good. Replace them with comfortable and supportive shoes that can ease the pain and improve your foot conditions — if you act quickly, you might see a major turnaround!

If you don’t know where to go after throwing out your bad shoes, we can help you find great replacements and put your best foot forward with our impressive line of stylish orthopaedic footwear.

Your shoes are the likeliest cause behind your foot pain. Take some time to investigate if they’re too old, too big, too small or too unsupportive to stay in your closet. Then, go shopping to get yourself some footwear that is kinder to your feet.

Why does my toe hurt?

There are several reasons why your toe may be painful. The important thing to do is not ignore it, especially if the pain is accompanied with redness and swelling. Keep reading to find out what your next steps should be to find out the culprit to your pain.

  1. Ingrown toenail

An ingrown toenail is when the sides of your toenail grow into the surrounding skin. Once the nail pierces the skin, your body reacts by creating an inflammatory response to this, which leads to redness, swelling, warmth, and pain in the area. The longer the toe is left in this condition, the higher the risk of infection. How can you tell if you have an infection? The signs of an infection are somewhat similar to those of the body’s natural inflammatory response to a cut or wound, but greater in a sense. For instance, an infected ingrown toenail will increase in redness, swelling, pain, and warmth in addition to being accompanied by any of the following: a foul odor, maceration (moisture), pus (cloudy, creamy liquid), blood.

To find out more about ingrown toenails, such as what causes them and how they can be managed, click the link here

  1. Paronychia

Paronychia is the medical term to describe an infection of the hand or the foot at the location where the skin meets the nail, either on the sides of the nail or along its base. This infection can be bacterial or fungal in nature and is usually the result of damage to the skin (via biting or picking or any other physical trauma). Excessive and chronic moisture can also make the skin more vulnerable to these infections.

Similar to an ingrown toenail, paronychia will also present as a red, swollen, warm, and tender digit.

  1. Tinea Pedis

Although Tinea pedis also known as Athlete’s Foot, usually presents as itchy, dry, and flaky skin on the bottom of the foot, it can also be localized between the digits or along the sides of a single or multiple digit(s). Sometimes, Tinea Pedis features a cluster of small red vesicles, along a digit and may spread to adjacent digits. When left untreated, the toe may become red, swollen, and tender to the touch.

If you have a red, swollen, painful toe, regardless of the cause, book an appointment with a chiropodist today! Your chiropodist will be able to determine the cause of your pain and provide the necessary treatments to get you back on the path to good foot health. All the above conditions require medical attention, including a prescription for an oral or topical antibiotic or anti-fungal. In the meantime, as you wait for your appointment, try soaking your feet in a salt water bath for 5-10 minutes.

When you’re not soaking your feet, practice good hygiene and keep your feet clean and dry. Wear a new pair of clean socks everyday and let your feet breathe at home. Most microorganisms thrive in moist, dark environments.

Signs You Need A New Pair Of Shoes

Running/walking is a simple activity. There’s very little gear required.

Footwear is the exception. Shoes are your most important piece of gear, providing protection over the course of several hundred kilometres and helping lessen the impact and damage to your body. Most people go through a few pairs every year, and some even every month.

As you pile on the mileage, your shoe’s structure, and thus effectiveness, break down over time. Your shoes won’t feel the same out of the box as they do after 300-500 kilometres. It’s important to know when you need a new pair of shoes to help avoid injury and that starts with knowing what to look for in your footwear.

Below are some signs that your shoes could be due for an upgrade, and what to do to help lengthen their lifespan.

Culprit #1: A reduction in bounce as well as aches, pains, and sore joints.

Typically, running shoes can last between 500-750 kilometres. Over time, the cushioning breaks down and it no longer provides the same amount of energy return as it did right out of the box. If you feel your shoes are feeling flat, and don’t have that same type of bounce, it’s likely time for a new pair of shoes.

There are however ways to extend the lifespan of your shoes.

Try: purchasing two or three pairs of shoes at a time, and alternate use. Giving your shoes a day or two in between runs allows the cushioning to return to form, and lengthens its life. Purchasing in bulk can also be beneficial if your favourite shoe is discontinued or altered, which is commonplace as new iterations of models are released every year. Plus, bulk purchases can lead to lower shipping costs – per unit – if ordered online.

The type of shoe and amount of cushioning also plays a role. Minimalist shoes have less cushioning and thus you’ll feel the effects at a faster rate.

Your weight can also come into play. The heavier you are, the greater the load, and thus the quicker the foam cushioning will compress and break down.

As you can tell, there isn’t one reason why your shoes wear down over time but in fact many.

Culprit #2: Wrinkles across the foam on the mid-sole and heel of the shoe.

You may notice a shoe is breaking down by feel. Additionally, as is the case here, there are visual cues that make apparent the condition of your footwear. When your shoes’ foam begins to crease and wrinkle, it’s a sign that your shoes are beginning to age. However, this cycle is totally normal and doesn’t necessarily mean your shoes are toast.

Try: running on softer surfaces more often to alleviates the impacts that go through your shoes. Running on grass, gravel, and dirt is easier on your shoes – and your body – versus asphalt or concrete.

Culprit #3: Uneven wear patterns

Try: avoid wearing your running shoes casually throughout the day because added hours break down shoes at a faster rate. Your gait while walking is different than running too so you might be wearing your shoes out in unusual and unwanted patterns if you use your primary trainers as hybrids.

Uneven wear patterns are not necessarily a bad thing, but you should take them into account because it might be easier to troubleshoot an injury. Look for areas that are bare of tread like a car tire.

Culprit #4: Damaged heel counter and frayed edges.

The heel cup around your Achilles can break down, which can lead to chafing and blisters.

Try: avoiding tied laces when putting on and taking off your shoes. The laces are there for a reason. If you consistently slip your shoes on and off while tied, you’re likely adding more pressure to the heel counter and the inner material of the shoe. Tie and untie your shoes before and after each use.

Avoid using the dryer if your shoes get wet too as heat can break down the upper material as well as the cushioning of the shoe.

Culprit #5: Tears in the upper.

Look for rips around the toebox, as well as along the sides of your feet as that’s where the upper attaches to the midsole, leaving the seam vulnerable. To avoid blisters, and other foot problems, it’s important to find a shoe that fits right for the shape of your foot.

Try: changing to shoes that better suit you. These days, many brands offer wide versions of most models, and some brands are known for making wider shoes including Asics and Altra, both of which provide roomier a toe box compared to other brands.

Need help deciding on a pair of new shoes? Need a gait analysis done? Visit the clinic today.

5 Ways to Control Foot Odour

Do your feet carry an unpleasant odour after being cooped up in shoes all long day at work? Or maybe after a good workout? Foot perspiration is a normal occurrence, but it can lead to odours that are downright embarrassing. Continue reading if you want to know 5 ways you can control your foot odour this spring season!

Practice proper foot hygiene

Wash your feet daily, not neglecting to wash and dry well in between the toes to help reduce bacterial and fungal load on the foot. Use an antibacterial soap in lukewarm water and once in a while, exfoliate your feet using a foot file.

Wear socks with your shoes

Wearing socks with your closed toe shoes is the simplest way you can control your foot odour. It not only reduces the friction between your skin and the interior of your footwear, but it also reduces the accumulation of dirt, oil, and dead skin cells. Make sure to wash your socks regularly and wear a new, clean, and dry pair every day

Moisture wicking socks (and shoes)

Cotton, wool, bamboo socks will help to wick the moisture away from the skin keep the feet dry. Socks with anti-bacterial components such as, copper, silver, and zinc are also a good option.  In the same way, stay away from shoes made of materials that provide poor ventilation like leather, rubber, and other synthetic materials.

Foot powder

Applying foot powder helps to absorb moisture on the foot and reduce sweating, which is usually the cause of foot odour. Using a foot powder with antifungal properties will also protect against fungal infections. Remember, fungus love moist and dark environments. Try Gehwol Med Foot Powder to fight against odour, excess moisture, and fungal infections.

Gehwol Med Foot Powder

Foot and shoe deodorant

Gehwol also carries a line of foot and shoe deodorants, both in cream and spray format. Gehwol Med Deodorant Foot Cream utilizes a combination of  manuka oil and active zinc oxides help to protect the skin from bacteria and fungi, eliminate foot odours, and leave the skin soft and protected.  Gehwol Foot and Shoe Deodorizing Spray can also be used to spray into your shoes and is great for the athlete on the go.

Gehwol Deodorant Foot Cream and Gewhol Foot & Shoe Deodorizing Spray

Regain your confidence by following these simple steps to odour-free feet. For more information and selection on Gehwol products, visit Feet First Clinic located in Downtown Toronto. One of our staff will be more than happy to assist you. If you are concerned you may have a bacterial or fungal infection, book an appointment with one of our chiropodists for a foot assessment.

4 Tips To Protect Your Feet As Temperatures Rise

Summer is a wonderful time of year for outdoor enthusiasts!

Any reason you can head outdoors when it’s warm is a good one. But with warmer temperatures and more sun exposure, it’s important to take certain precautions because it’s not only nice to have your feet looking their best, but it’s important to keep them in good health.

Use sunscreen

With rising temperatures and the change in seasons comes higher UV indexes. In all likelihood, you’ll be going barefoot, or wearing open-toed footwear, more often in the summer months. When being outside for prolonged periods of time, applying sunscreen is essential. Being exposed to UV ratings of 10-15 means you could sunburn in as few as 10 minutes.

When applying sunscreen, you often remember the usual spots: face, ears, arms, and legs. But don’t forget the tops of your feet. Note that your feet may not be exposed to the sun as often as the rest of your body so protection against UVA and UVB rays – the two most damaging to our skin – is particularly important. UVB rays can cause sunburns as they tend to damage the skin’s more superficial epidermal layers while UVA rays can penetrate to the deeper skin levels.

According to Health Canada, look for sunscreens with SPF (sun protection factor) of 30 or more that have “broad-spectrum” on the label to screen out most of the UVA and UVB rays.

Wear proper socks

Your socks are the last line of defense when it comes to foot protection. In the summer, your feet can perspire. Keeping your feet dry can help prevent athlete’s foot, fungus, and blisters. So, moisture-wicking socks can come in handy. Further, use household items like baking soda to put into your shoes to absorb moisture and use cornstarch on your feet for the same effect.

Leading brands and industry favourites include Stance, Darn Tough, Balega, Drymax, and Smartwool.

Don’t skip on arch support

Convenience is the goal in the summer. Slipping in and out of flip-flops and sandals is easy when lounging around the pool, at the beach, or hanging out on your deck and patio. They’re great for short-term usage, but be careful when wearing them for hours on end. Their lack of support under your arch can make your feet ache and cause painful injuries including plantar fasciitis and to your metatarsal bones.

Though some sandals and flip-flops lack adequate arch support, some brands do. Birkenstocks, for example, mold over time to the shape of your foot, equalizing pressure and weight across the foot instead of putting pressure on the balls of your foot and heel. We offer an excellent selection of Birkenstock products in-store at Feet First Clinic. Check us out at 2481 Bloor Street West.

Even popular sports brands like Hoka One One now offer supportive flip flops called the Ora Recovery Slide. Of course, everyone reacts differently to footwear so experiment until you find products that work best for you.

Treat your feet

Protect your feet in the summer by addressing issues including discoloured or black toenails, callouses, dried skin, fungus, and blisters.

Tips To Protect Feet Summer

Simple tips including keeping your nails short, scrubbing away dead skin, and keeping your feet dry (or moisturizing, if necessary) can help keep your feet healthy throughout the summer. If any foot issues arise or persist, visit the clinic and talk to an expert to discuss the appropriate course of action.

Practical Advice for Taking Care of Your Feet This Summer

Summer is prime time for trips to the beach, afternoons by the poolside and long walks in the park. Although these seasonal pastimes are relaxing and fun, they can take a toll on your feet. Read this practical advice on how to take care of your feet, whether you’re at the beach, the pool or anywhere else:

 

On the Beach

When dressing for the beach, you will probably grab a pair of flip flops. They’re breezy, quick to slip on and they’re easy to clean. And, if they break, you can always buy a new pair for under $10. The problem is that they’re terrible for your feet.

 

One of the many reasons why flip flops are bad for your feet is that the unsupported design forces you to strain your muscles to walk. You have to grip the material with your toes so the sole lifts with each step. Repeating this motion will hurt your feet and encourage hammer toe.

 

You should get some orthopedic sandals this summer to replace your cheap pairs of flip flops that are slowly hurting your toes, your feet, your hips and your lower back. The right sandals will be just as low-maintenance as flip flops, but they will have proper arch support, cushioning and grip. Feet First Clinic has an impressive collection of sandals from brands like Fitflop, Birkenstock and NAOT.

 

When you’re wearing sandals, remember to slather on some sunscreen on your feet. Reapply every two hours or directly after you go swimming, even if you’ve chosen a water-resistant formula.

 

Putting sunscreen on your feet will do more than save you from awkward sunburns. It will protect you from contracting foot melanoma — this is a rare but severe type of skin cancer, especially because it can spread unnoticed. If you have moles on your feet, keep an eye on them to see whether they change color, size, shape or appearance in any way.

At the Pool

If you’re going to go swimming at the community pool, you need to bring a pair of pool shoes or shower shoes. People will be walking barefoot on the ground, leaving sweat, dirt and germs behind. Bacteria thrive in moist areas, which means the poolside, the public showers and the locker room will be hot spots for infections like athlete’s foot or plantar warts.

 

If you think you’re suffering from an infection, you should contact a foot specialist today for professional diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan. People living with diabetes or weakened immune systems should make the appointment right away for the sake of their well-being.

 

Everywhere Else

Ballet flats, flat sneakers and unsupportive shoes are popular for this season. Choosing these shoes for everyday-wear will inevitably result in discomfort. If you’re tired of foot pain, treat your feet right this summer by getting custom orthotic inserts or by choosing stylish orthopaedic shoes to wear all day long.

 

A bad sunburn on your feet will force you to leave the beach early so that you can soothe them with Aloe Vera and cold packs. Athlete’s foot will make you regret your trip to the pool and prevent you from swimming until it’s gone. Foot strain will encourage you to cut your walk short. Taking better care of your feet will make sure your summer plans don’t get sidetracked.  

 

 

Are Your Shoes Too Small? Here Are the Warning Signs

A “bad fit” doesn’t mean that you won’t be able to slip the shoe onto your foot. It could mean that the toe box is too close to the tips of your toes, the heel notch is digging into your skin, or the top is pressing into the bridge of the foot. If you don’t notice these discomforts, here are some warning signs that your shoes are too small:

Blisters

Unless they are caused by a sunburn, an infection or an allergy, foot blisters are caused by friction from the shoe material repeatedly rubbing against your skin. If you’ve noticed the fluid-filled pockets appearing on your feet, your shoes are probably too small.  

Bruised Toenails

Toenail bruises come from impact. The impact could be stubbing your toe on a step. Or the impact could be knocking your toenails on the edge of the toe box over and over — this is why runners often have bruised toenails.

The blood trapped under the nail makes it change colour. The nail goes from red to brown to purple and then black. It will stay that colour until it grows out after 6 to 9 months or until the nail falls off.

Hot Foot

You may recognize a sensation commonly called hot foot, where your feet are incredibly hot after going for a walk or finishing a workout. Friction from too-tight shoes will make your feet swell and feel like they’re burning.

 

Calluses

A foot callus is a rough and dry patch of skin on the sole. When the area is dealing with too much friction or pressure, the skin thickens and develops a callus.

Normally, you can try to get rid of your callus by doing a foot soak and removing the dry skin with a callus shaver. If you have diabetes or a weakened immune system, you should make an appointment with a chiropodist for foot callus removal because you don’t want to risk a foot infection.

Corns

Corns are similar to calluses. They are hardened, raised bumps that form because of too much friction or pressure on the area. They tend to appear on top or between toes. They can be painful to the touch. You can make an appointment with the experts at Feet First clinic to undergo a safe and effective corn removal procedure.

If your shoes don’t fit properly, you shouldn’t wear them. You should get a new pair of shoes as soon as possible. When you’re buying a replacement pair, you should follow these steps to guarantee a proper shoe fit:

  • Have your feet measured to determine the accurate size.
  • Try on the shoe with the laces tied up.
  • Walk around in the shoes to test if your heel slips, your toes hit the toe box or the material pinches.

Consider getting custom orthotics to give your feet additional comfort and support. These specialized accessories will help counteract the effects of standing all day and walking all day, like soreness, calluses and corns.

Whatever you do, don’t ascribe to the mentality of breaking in your shoes. The method is reserved for leather dress shoes, which can be stretched to prevent any aches and pains. It was never meant for running shoes, sneakers or sandals.

If your shoe doesn’t fit properly in the store, it won’t fit when you get home. Don’t bear through discomfort in hopes that your footwear will eventually mold to your feet. Getting the right size and fit should be your number one priority.