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Top 5 Foot Conditions to Self Assess At Home

Published: September 4, 2020

Last modified: September 28, 2020

For most people, feet are unknown territory. Being that they are the farthest body part from our eyes, they don’t get as much attention as they should. Feet should be cleaned thoroughly once a day and assessed for changes to the skin and or structure. Pain is another sign that you should not ignore. If you happen to notice changes to your feet, to help you decipher what it may be, we have come up with the following list. Continue reading to discover common foot problems and the signs to look out for if you have them.

Plantar Warts

Plantar-Wart-4-1800×1200

A plantar wart is a small growth that appears in weight-bearing areas of the foot. They are caused by the Human Papilloma Virus and are relatively harmless. At times, warts do resolve spontaneously on their own; however, some do require treatment from a medical professional.

What to look for:

  • Small, fleshy, round, rough growth usually with overlying callus
  • Tiny black dots in the lesion
  • A lesion that disturbs the normal skin lines
  • Pain with standing or pinching of the lesion 

Athlete’s Foot 

 

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Athlete’s Foot is known as tinea pedis in the medical world. It an infection of the skin, the culprit being a fungus. As the name suggests, Athlete’s Foot is common in athletes or people who have sweaty feet.

What to look for:

  • Peeling, scaly skin in between the toes or bottoms of feet
  • Red rash
  • If chronic, can present as very dry, flaky skin
  • Associated itch/burn/sting 

Bunions

Hallux valgus, bunion in woman foot on white background

 What to look for:

  • A bony bump at the side of the base of the big toe
  • Redness, swelling, pain at the 1st MTP joint
  • Big toe may start to turn towards the smaller toes beside it

Plantar Fasciitis

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Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a fibrous band that runs from the heel bone to the ball of the foot. It works to support the arch of your foot and absorb the shock when you walk. When it becomes strained, it can develop small tears, usually near the heel, which cause inflammation and pain.

What to look for:

  • Sharp heel pain, usually at the inner heel
  • Pain is worse with your first steps in the morning out of bed  
  • Pain tends to subside as you go about your day
  • Pain may return with initial steps after sitting or resting

Flat Feet

flatfeet

Flat feet can only be diagnosed with you standing in a weight-bearing position. It is described as a low or nonexistent arch profile. You can check your arch by wetting your feet and standing on a piece of paper or concrete ground. If the imprint of your foot is relatively the same width along the length of your foot, you likely have a flat foot. If you have flat feet, you are also likely to roll your feet towards your arches when you walk (ie you overpronate).

What to look for:

  • Low or nonexistent arch in the foot
  • Widening of the foot when you stand
  • Possible pain at the arch of the foot, ankle, knee, or low back

If you think you have any of the above foot problems, it is of your best interest to see a Licensed Chiropodist for further assessment. A chiropodist is a foot specialist who is trained to assess and treat various diseases and conditions of the foot.

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